Work On Your Business, Not In It

What you need to do is start working ON your business NOT IN it.

This is a growing catchphrase used by business coaches and consultants who are trying to help CEOs scale their social enterprises. Hands up, I’m guilty as charged here as well!

When you work with CEOs and leaders on strategy you will hear the excuses:

“I haven’t had time to do that”

“This and this came up that I had to sort out”

“I need to cancel a meeting” etc.

Working in the business, wanting to make the organisation run smoothly at an operational level, working directly with end users and getting stuck in to solve problems for the team is a great thing for a leader.

However this approach is not sustainable if you want to grow the impact of your organisation. To grow requires a real strategic lead and the headspace to look and work on the business. Otherwise you will be for forever firefighting, which can still allow growth but not to the scale and impact that is possible.

So what can you do as a leader to start to make this transition, to create time and get off the treadmill?

1. Get the right team in place

How does the old saying go – the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

All the best leaders surround themselves with a great team. This will give you confidence to take that step back knowing that the organisation is being well run and you have empowered the team to take ownership.

Often overlooked is the importance of succession planning despite its potential benefits to the organisation; this should not just be for the leader but all key staff. The process ticks the boxes for keeping it strategic, fresh, innovative and is great for staff development.

2. Prioritise and delegate

Two key things to master but we are also notoriously bad at – prioritisation and delegation. All leaders at some stage would have gone through a prioritisation test or exercise at interview, obviously doing very well at the time but then forgetting the principles when actually starting the job.

The art of delegation – choose the right tasks to delegate, identify the right people to delegate to, and delegate in the right way.

3. Give yourself permission

Easier said than done and perhaps this should be No 1. This is all about giving you the emotional permission to take a step away from the business to focus on the strategic direction. I think this is especially hard for a founder who’s in a leadership role. But, if you have all the other support blocks described in place, then this will be easier to do.

4. Reconnect with your actual role

Have a look at your job description sometime – what does it actually say? It will probably have words like strategic, leadership, developing new business, building key relationships etc. – not firefighting in the business!

5. Write it down

We are all intelligent people but for some reason, we try and keep the ideas and plans in our heads. This takes up a lot of emotional energy; it takes time to keep it there and can be stressful. A plan needs to be written down so it can be shared with a wide range of internal and external stakeholders.

The strategy does not have to be complex; it shouldn’t be like reading a copy of War and Peace. A good plan can be written down in 10 pages or less. It needs to be accessible, actually used and updated on a regular basis.

Our Strategy on a Page is an even more economic way of presenting the absolute essentials of planning and guiding your enterprise concisely and with laser-like precision.

So, get the proverbial helicopter out and have a look at what is going on in and out of your organisation – it’s a flight worth investing in.